Making Mosaics

Baby, Part 4

pam 004

The deep purple stained glass, between the pink/purple metallic vitreous and pink glitter, is a great choice. The plan is to finish the rest of the mosaic in a pink stained glass.

Advertisements
Standard
Uncategorized

Baby Part 2

pam 004

Because the client requested pink and purple tesserae in this name mosaic, I chose brown for the ceramic letters. My initial instinct was a single border, of metallic vitreous, in pink/purple hues. However, I think I will play with more border options. Absolutely, I want pink surrounding her name. Presently, I have my eye on some hues of purple stained glass and there are some lovely pink glitter glass tiles. We’ll see… Color, color, color!

Standard
Making Mosaics

She Said Yes and So It Began…

Pam 002

She has chosen red, aqua, turquoise and pink, as some of her favorite colors. We will begin with her new name in opus romano and the border in metallic vitreous. The letters, in red opus romano, will be halved and quartered. The metallic vitreous will not be cut. Well, that’s the plan… I am thinking of a light pink around her name, so that the letters will “pop”. That being said, the opus romano is a bold shade on its own. Happy, happy, happy!

Standard
Uncategorized

Milana, a New Precious Baby

The client chose brown, pink and black as colors for this mosaic name plaque. Since the name is central to this mosaic, I used black venetian tiles. The background will be various shades of pink. I experimented with a few tesserae. (When you want to emphasize a specific part of your mosaic, make sure that you use darker shades. Then, use lighter colors around it.) Instead of a wrap-around border, the design I chose was a border only for the top and bottom. An “A/B” pattern was used. The larger tiles are dark brownish-black metallic vitreous. The smaller tiles are iridio. Both metallic vitreous and iridio “catch” light.Pam 005

Standard
Making Mosaics

1 Down and 2 to Go

Pam 001

As you can see in the picture, the first dinosaur design is completed. I ended up using darker blue and green opus romano for the outline of the dinosaur. The scales were completely done in opus romano. In perusing my collection of tesserae, I came across some wonderful muted stained glass with texture on one side and smooth on the other. ┬áBoth sides were included. The light frosted glass has hints of blues, greens, etc… That worked well for the inside of the dinosaur. In considering the background, 2 aquas were used – 1 lighter and 1 darker. Again, both the textured and smooth sides were used. For distinction, black gems became the eyes. Black stained glass formed the mouth. A double border allowed for the outer layer stressing blues and greens, while the interior included the same tesserae from the joint mosaic. (note – much fewer red) The outer layer was comprised of venetian and metallic vitreous glass. The interior was made from red and gray ceramic tile, as well as white venetian.

$$$ Money Saving – I will not grout this until I have a couple more mosaics.

Standard